DaaMom's View of the World

I’m so proud of my daughter. She has grown to a beautiful, confident, loving woman. She is more than her Dad and I hoped for. Love you sweetie.

uncannie:

I’m turning 28 on Friday and it’s weird to think about everything that has happened so far in my life. At 18 I never would have thought that this is where I would be ten years later. I never would have thought that I would be living with the love of my life in a beautiful apartment with a view of…

Anthony Bourdain dines with my Uncle

Anthony Bourdain does a special on the Travel Channel about Maine. Who does he end up sharing a bean suppah with? My Uncle!  

http://www.travelchannel.com/Embedded?id=188abff19e359310VgnVCM1000003409330aRCRD

I just entered this recipe in the NH Dairy Mac & Cheese contest.  I hope it wins!
Baked Italian Macaroni & Cheese
½ chopped sweet onion
1 teas. Cinnamon
½ c. water
8 oz small elbow macaroni
6 very thin slices prosciutto (about 3 ounces)
6 t. Cabot salt free butter
¼ c panko crumbs
1 t plus 2 teas all-purpose flour
1 ¼ c. Hatchland Farm whole milk
1 ¼ c. Cabot pepper jack cheese - shredded
¾ c.  Cabot extra sharp cheddar cheese - shredded
½ teas freshly ground black pepper
½ teas nutmeg
¾ c seeded and chopped tomato
Preheat oven to 375F with a rack in the middle.
Place the prosciutto in the freezer for 5 minutes to make it easier to cut and line the cups with.
Put the onion, cinnamon and salt in a frying pan with the water. Simmer uncovered for about 30 minutes until the water has evaporated and the onion is tender. Add the 4 t. butter to the skillet and let them brown over medium heat.
In a large saucepan bring (about 4 quarts) of water to a boil over high heat. Add pasta and cook according to package directions. When the pasta is al dente, reserve ¼ c of the cooking water, then drain.
Meanwhile, cut the prosciutto in half crosswise. Place 1 slice in each well of a 12-well muffin pan, pressing the prosciutto evenly into the bottom and up the sides of each well; set aside.
Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a small frying pan over medium heat until foaming. Add the panko and cook, stirring occasionally, until light golden brown, about 4 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside.
While the pasta is draining, rinse the saucepan and wipe it dry. Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in the saucepan over medium-low heat until foaming. Add the flour and whisk until smooth. Cook, whisking occasionally, until the flour has darkened slightly in color, about 2 to 3 minutes.
Add the milk very slowly, whisking it into the flour-butter mixture. Continue cooking, whisking constantly to smooth out any lumps, until the mixture simmers and thickens, about 6 to 7 minutes.
Remove the saucepan from the heat. Add the reserved pasta water, cheese, nutmeg and pepper and whisk until the cheese has melted and the mixture is smooth. Add the chopped tomatoes and cooked macaroni and stir to combine.
Divide the pasta mixture among the wells of the prepared muffin pan and sprinkle with the toasted panko.  Cook until the edges of the mac ‘n’ cheese cups are bubbling slightly and the tops are light golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes.
Remove the muffin pan to a wire rack and let it cool for 5 minutes. Run a small knife around the perimeter of each well to loosen and remove the prosciutto cups. Serve immediately.

I just entered this recipe in the NH Dairy Mac & Cheese contest.  I hope it wins!

Baked Italian Macaroni & Cheese

½ chopped sweet onion

1 teas. Cinnamon

½ c. water

8 oz small elbow macaroni

6 very thin slices prosciutto (about 3 ounces)

6 t. Cabot salt free butter

¼ c panko crumbs

1 t plus 2 teas all-purpose flour

1 ¼ c. Hatchland Farm whole milk

1 ¼ c. Cabot pepper jack cheese - shredded

¾ c.  Cabot extra sharp cheddar cheese - shredded

½ teas freshly ground black pepper

½ teas nutmeg

¾ c seeded and chopped tomato

Preheat oven to 375F with a rack in the middle.

Place the prosciutto in the freezer for 5 minutes to make it easier to cut and line the cups with.

Put the onion, cinnamon and salt in a frying pan with the water. Simmer uncovered for about 30 minutes until the water has evaporated and the onion is tender. Add the 4 t. butter to the skillet and let them brown over medium heat.

In a large saucepan bring (about 4 quarts) of water to a boil over high heat. Add pasta and cook according to package directions. When the pasta is al dente, reserve ¼ c of the cooking water, then drain.

Meanwhile, cut the prosciutto in half crosswise. Place 1 slice in each well of a 12-well muffin pan, pressing the prosciutto evenly into the bottom and up the sides of each well; set aside.

Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in a small frying pan over medium heat until foaming. Add the panko and cook, stirring occasionally, until light golden brown, about 4 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside.

While the pasta is draining, rinse the saucepan and wipe it dry. Melt the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in the saucepan over medium-low heat until foaming. Add the flour and whisk until smooth. Cook, whisking occasionally, until the flour has darkened slightly in color, about 2 to 3 minutes.

Add the milk very slowly, whisking it into the flour-butter mixture. Continue cooking, whisking constantly to smooth out any lumps, until the mixture simmers and thickens, about 6 to 7 minutes.

Remove the saucepan from the heat. Add the reserved pasta water, cheese, nutmeg and pepper and whisk until the cheese has melted and the mixture is smooth. Add the chopped tomatoes and cooked macaroni and stir to combine.

Divide the pasta mixture among the wells of the prepared muffin pan and sprinkle with the toasted panko.  Cook until the edges of the mac ‘n’ cheese cups are bubbling slightly and the tops are light golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes.

Remove the muffin pan to a wire rack and let it cool for 5 minutes. Run a small knife around the perimeter of each well to loosen and remove the prosciutto cups. Serve immediately.

The Winds of Life

We, like millions of people on the face of this earth, can make no sense of what occurred in a small town in America a few days ago. Young children and loving adults, like bright candles in this holiday season, were extinguished by an icy wind that came from neither east or west, nor north or south; rather a place where few of us can imagine or envision. Our eyes resist, then give in to tears for the lives of those that were lost, and those loving lives that are left to mourn forever. Mothers and fathers, families and friends, we have no words that can relight those candles or bring back their warmth. Your eyes will never again see the glow of their beauty, but we pray that you will always feel their warmth and guiding lights within your hearts.

In such a tragic time, there is only one road for us to travel, one commitment to collectively make. That commitment is to love more deeply, to care more frequently and to realize that we must be responsible. We must be responsible not only to be prepared for the possibility of the icy winds of the world we live in, but the responsibility and urgency to create a world where such winds can never again blow, never again destroy the lives of beautiful innocent human beings.

We pray for those who have departed, we pray for those who loved them who are left behind. And we promise you that we will do all that is humanly possible to build a world that sails on the winds of love and kindness.

Happy Anniversary to my best friend!  Thank you for a great 29 years!

Happy Anniversary to my best friend!  Thank you for a great 29 years!

RIP Aunt Phil
uncannie:

My great great aunt died.
Philomena (Mercieri) Anastasi, 99, of Winsted, formerly of Bristol, passed away Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. She was born April 19, 1913, in Turi, province of Bari, Italy. She came to the United States in 1927 and, inspired by all the movie westerns, desperately hoped to get a horse.
Philomena was a loving, kind woman who never had a harsh word for anyone. She always said that everyone had good in them; you just had to look for it. Her door was always open and she was always ready to listen to a friend in need. Even in the nursing home, she never failed to clasp the hand of someone who looked upset and to offer encouraging words.

RIP Aunt Phil

uncannie:

My great great aunt died.

Philomena (Mercieri) Anastasi, 99, of Winsted, formerly of Bristol, passed away Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. She was born April 19, 1913, in Turi, province of Bari, Italy. She came to the United States in 1927 and, inspired by all the movie westerns, desperately hoped to get a horse.


Philomena was a loving, kind woman who never had a harsh word for anyone. She always said that everyone had good in them; you just had to look for it. Her door was always open and she was always ready to listen to a friend in need. Even in the nursing home, she never failed to clasp the hand of someone who looked upset and to offer encouraging words.

This young woman put in to words what so many cannot. Thank you Eve.

Cheesecake Nutella Twists
All of my favorite things.. cheesecake, nutella and pastry!
I think I died and went to heaven.

Cheesecake Nutella Twists

All of my favorite things.. cheesecake, nutella and pastry!

I think I died and went to heaven.

Thank you from the bottom of my pants!
http://above44degreegarden.blogspot.com/2012/04/unusual-planters.html

This recipe screams “eat me”.  My kids would love this!